Exodus

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Our church has been exploring the book of Exodus recently through a sermon series titled, “Becoming God’s People.” Believe it or not, it’s been amazing. I think many people hear “Exodus” or “The Old Testament” and their eyes immediately roll back in their heads and a yawn ensues. Oftentimes, I’ve heard remarked, “The Old Testament doesn’t apply to our times; it has no bearing on us now. It doesn’t really relate to today.” To that I say, “Wow! You’re kidding, right?!” I’m a bit shocked, really, because when I think about it long enough, I realize we are no different from the Israelites. We complain, we grumble, we disobey. We, like Moses, are oftentimes reluctant leaders. The Israelites had the very presence of God (through a pillar of cloud and a pillar of fire), and we have the very presence of God (through Jesus Christ and the indwelling Holy Spirit). Yet we both murmur and fret, disbelieve and turn our stubborn hearts away from Him.

It’s amazing to think about, really. The more I read about the Israelites, the more I see myself in them. Like many of the chosen people of Israel, I find myself getting caught up in legalism, trusting in rules over relationship. I, like them, fail to give grace, but offer plenty of judgement. I am stingy with love, but don’t hesitate to dump a truckload of harshness.

I particularly identify with Moses. Here he is in the wilderness, minding his own business, doing his own thing shepherding when God grabs his attention and gives him a mission. It’s not like he misunderstood or misheard God, either. God was abundantly clear in His instructions for Moses. (Ex. 3) Like being hit with a 2 X 4, Moses couldn’t deny what was being asked of him. He knew what he was supposed to do.

But how does Moses respond? Is he happy to leave the wilderness, to step out of the place to which he had run when he fled from Pharaoh? (Ex. 2:15) Was he eager to serve God, confident that God would be with him and work through him? Did he reply, “Yes! Finally! This is what I’ve been waiting for!”

No.

No, in fact, Moses responds by saying God’s got the wrong guy, that he is a nobody, that God is asking a completely unqualified guy to do the job. He continues by trying to convince God that no one will believe him and throws every excuse he can think of not to obey. He even resorts to begging God to please don’t make him go, don’t make him be the one to speak. Friends, does this sound familiar? Or am I the only one that can relate to Moses? I don’t think so. I believe there are many Christians like me who know what God wants them to do, but, like Moses, argue with God. We plead with Him to send someone else. We recite our list of faults to God, hoping that he’ll pick someone else to speak. Oh, friends. I relate.

What amazes me in these first chapters of Exodus is how God specifically states what He will do. He emphatically tells Moses that He will provide. He makes it clear that He knows every detail and foresees even Pharaoh’s response. He reassures Moses that he is not alone and will not be forsaken, that Moses will go in God’s power and strength. (Ex. 4) Friends, is there something you know God is asking you to do, but you keep giving Him excuses? Does what He’s asking you to do terrify you? Are you doubting your own ability? Have you questioned God, wondering if He’s made a mistake, chosen the wrong woman (or man)?

Ultimately, Moses obeyed God. He and Aaron went to Pharaoh and spoke God’s word. It wasn’t easy. In fact, it was downright hard. I always remember, though, something a precious friend of mine once said: “Just because it’s a difficult road, doesn’t mean it’s the wrong road.” (Wise words from my dear friend Julie who died 12 years ago, yet is alive in heaven.)

God will ask you to do hard things, my friend. But, just as He did with the Israelites, He will do for you: Provide.

Blessings,

Angie signature

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